Numbers in Spanish

Numbers are a great place to start for beginner Spanish learners; they come up in conversation often, and it is really easy to get the hang of them. You can get straight to learning the numbers in Spanish right now!

numbers numbers

Counting in Spanish: Cardinal Numbers

The cardinal number system in Spanish is really quite simple. Let's take a look at the numbers 1 to 100 in Spanish to see this in action.

1 - 100

0

cero

30

treinta

60

sesenta

90

noventa

1

uno

31

treinta y uno

61

sesenta y uno

91

noventa y uno

2

dos

32

treinta y dos

62

sesenta y dos

92

noventa y dos

3

tres

33

treinta y tres

63

sesenta y tres

93

noventa y tres

4

cuatro

34

treinta y cuatro

64

sesenta y cuatro

94

noventa y cuatro

5

cinco

35

treinta y cinco

65

sesenta y cinco

95

noventa y cinco

6

seis

36

treinta y seis

66

sesenta y seis

96

noventa y seis

7

siete

37

treinta y siete

67

sesenta y siete

97

noventa y siete

8

ocho

38

treinta y ocho

68

sesenta y ocho

98

noventa y ocho

9

nueve

39

treinta y nueve

69

sesenta y nueve

99

noventa y nueve

10

diez

40

cuarenta

70

setenta

100

cien

11

once

41

cuarenta y uno

71

setenta y uno

12

doce

42

cuarenta y dos

72

setenta y dos

13

trece

43

cuarenta y tres

73

setenta y tres

14

catorce

44

cuarenta y cuatro

74

setenta y cuatro

15

quince

45

cuarenta y cinco

75

setenta y cinco

16

dieciséis

46

cuarenta y seis

76

setenta y seis

17

diecisiete

47

cuarenta y siete

77

setenta y siete

18

dieciocho

48

cuarenta y ocho

78

setenta y ocho

19

diecinueve

49

cuarenta y nueve

79

setenta y nueve

20

veinte

50

cincuenta

80

ochenta

21

veintiuno

51

cincuenta y uno

81

ochenta y uno

22

veintidós

52

cincuenta y dos

82

ochenta y dos

23

veintitrés

53

cincuenta y tres

83

ochenta y tres

24

veinticuatro

54

cincuenta y cuatro

84

ochenta y cuatro

25

veinticinco

55

cincuenta y cinco

85

ochenta y cinco

26

veintiséis

56

cincuenta y seis

86

ochenta y seis

27

veintisiete

57

cincuenta y siete

87

ochenta y siete

28

veintiocho

58

cincuenta y ocho

88

ochenta y ocho

29

veintinueve

59

cincuenta y nueve

89

ochenta y nueve

If you are worried about having to memorize all those numbers, look closer and you will start noticing some patterns:

  • Numbers 16 to 19 are formed by adding the corresponding number (6 to 9) to the prefix dieci-.
  • Numbers 21 to 29 are formed by adding the corresponding number (1 to 9) to the prefix veinti- (notice how spelling rules dictate that veintidós, veintitrés and veintiséis have an accent mark).
  • Numbers 30 to 99 are really simple: just pair a multiple of ten (like 30, 40, 50, etc.) with the conjunction "y" and a number from 1 to 9. For instance, a number like 87 is said ochenta y siete, literally, eighty and seven.

101 - 999

So, what if you are looking for a three-digit number? Those are also very simple. First, you'll have to learn how to call multiples of 100:

200

doscientos

300

trescientos

400

cuatrocientos

500

quinientos

600

seiscientos

700

setecientos

800

ochocientos

900

novecientos

To read the numbers in between multiples of 100, just read the multiple of 100 and then the two-digit number that follows it. When doing this, keep in mind that the number 100 (cien) will change to ciento. Here are some examples:

102

ciento dos

378

trescientos setenta y ocho

505

quinientos cinco

722

setecientos veintidós

999

novecientos noventa y nueve

Thousands and Millions

Let's get to even bigger figures. Just like in English, numbers in Spanish are read from left to right. This means that if a number has 9 digits, you will first read the millions, then the thousands and finally the hundreds. Let's look at some examples and vocabulary to illustrate this:

1000

mil

2000

dos mil

3300

tres mil trescientos

10 000

diez mil

20 035

veinte mil treinta y cinco

36 000

treinta y seis mil

100 000

cien mil

369 000

trescientos sesenta y nueve mil

987 654

novecientos ochenta y siete mil seiscientos cincuenta y cuatro

1 000 000

un millón

2 000 000

dos millones

3 040 050

tres millones cuarenta mil cincuenta

1 000 000 000

mil millones

23 000 000 000

veintitrés mil millones

1 000 000 000 000

un billón

2 000 000 000 000

dos billones

Notice how the Spanish word "billón" sounds like "billion", but is actually a different number – trillion – in English. A billion in English is mil millones in Spanish.

Finally, keep in mind that cardinal numbers can function as both adjectives and nouns. When acting as an adjective, the number uno (one) changes to un, when describing a masculine noun, and una when describing a feminine noun. You can see this in the following examples:

  • Noun:
    El uno es un número impar (one is an odd number).
  • Masculine adjective:
    Tengo un hermano (I have one brother).
  • Feminine adjective:
    Tengo una hermana (I have one sister).

This also applies to all numbers ending in "uno" (like veintiuno, treinta y uno, cuarenta y uno, etc.).

Numbers ending in "-cientos" also change according to the gender of the noun they modify:

  • Doscientos edificios (two-hundred buildings).
  • Doscientas casas (two-hundred houses).

Putting Things in Order: Ordinal Numbers

While cardinal numbers are used for things like counting or reading out telephone numbers, ordinal numbers in Spanish, just like in English, are used to indicate the position of something in a series.

You can find the most used ordinal numbers in Spanish in the following table:

1st

Primero

11th

Onceavo

2nd

Segundo

12th

Doceavo

3rd

Tercero

13th

Decimotercero

4th

Cuarto

14th

Decimocuarto

5th

Quinto

15th

Decimoquinto

6th

Sexto

16th

Decimosexto

7th

Séptimo

17th

Decimoséptimo

8th

Octavo

18th

Decimoctavo

9th

Noveno

19th

Decimonoveno

10th

Décimo

20th

Vigésimo

When they act as adjectives, all ordinal numbers in Spanish change their ending depending on the gender and number of the noun they describe:

  • Segundo puesto (second place)
  • Segunda noche (second night)
  • Décimos Juegos Olímpicos (tenth Olympic Games)
  • Décima Olimpíada (tenth Olympic)

Doing Math in Spanish

Now that you know the proper names for numbers in Spanish, you can move onto some other vocabulary.

Here are the names for basic math operations in Spanish:

  • Sumar - To add
  • Restar - To subtract
  • Multiplicar - To multiply
  • Dividir - to divide

Let's take a look at how you read some mathematical expressions in Spanish:

  • 2 + 2 = 4 → Dos más dos es (igual a) cuatro.
  • 10 - 1 = 9 → Diez menos uno es (igual a) nueve.
  • 2 x 3 = 6 → Dos por tres es (igual a) seis.
  • 10 / 2 = 5 → Diez dividido dos es (igual a) cinco.
  • 30 % → Treinta por ciento.

Numbers in Writing

Although there isn't a definitive rule as to when to write out numbers in Spanish, the general practice is to use the numerical form for numbers greater than 10.

When using the numerical form, you should keep in mind that hundreds and thousands are usually separated by points or blank spaces instead of commas. At the same time, commas are usually reserved for separating decimals, although some countries (namely those closer to the US, like Mexico) use points for decimals.

Now that you know all of this, you can start incorporating Spanish numbers into your everyday life. Try counting in Spanish instead of English and soon it will become second nature!

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